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Good News & Bad News: Clearing the Air in Indian Cities

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Good News & Bad News: Clearing the Air in Indian Cities

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Contents
copyright
Preface
Sample Chapter
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Quick Overview

This presents the evidence of change in Indian cities – however small they may seem today. This captures actual policy decision and action in cities for clean air, public transport, walking and cycling, intermediate public transport, and car restraint initiatives like parking and fiscal measures. The challenge now is to learn from these experiences and to upscale the practices so that we can have the great leapfrog – move from cars to no cars, from pollution to clean air.

Authors: Anumita Roychowdhury
Pages : 262 Pages
ISBN: 978-81-86906-72-9
Publication : Centre for Science and Environment
Format: Paperback
Language: English


Authors: Anumita Roychowdhury
Pages : 262 Pages
ISBN: 978-81-86906-72-9
Publication : Centre for Science and Environment
Format: Paperback
Language: English

This is not a story of doom and gloom but of hope. Even though a lot is going wrong in our cities as evident in toxic air, illness, congestion and road accidents, a few cities have put a bold step forward. Evidence of this change is the learning curve for all. Our search puts a spot light on the positive policy action – the ‘Good News’ in cities - mega, big and small, for clean air and health, public transport, walking and cycling, autos and taxis, integration, restraint on vehicle usage through parking and fiscal strategy and unique efforts in our hill towns.

Findings are exciting -- Do you know Delhi and Bengaluru have increased bus ridership; Ahmedabad has increased the share of public transport trips from a dismally low level; Tumkur a small town has rolled out successful and profitable bus service; Chennai is reclaiming space from the roads to make walkable footpaths along bus routes; Bengaluru has designed parking policy as a travel demand management measure; hill towns of Gangtok and Aizawl do not allow car purchase without the proof of parking space; parking charges in Kolkata are the highest in the country and also cover residential areas; Delhi bars parking under parks; Dehradun bars cars in their central commercial area and Simla in their core urban area; cities are improving auto service; Chandigarh and cities of Punjab and Haryana are poised for a cycle rickshaw revolution, Pimpri Chinchwad, Rajasthan cities are inventing funding mechanism for public transport, Srinagar and Kochi are creatively using their waterways……. and the story goes on.

There is also the ‘Bad News’ -- cities are still mindlessly curtailing walking and cycling, designing cities for cars and hurting public transport users and adding to pollution, ill health and energy crisis. -- Kolkata bans cycling; Ahmedabad steps back on cycle track; Delhi is obsessive about flyovers, Mumbai is lost on ill designed unsafe skywalks while neglecting its walk access……

While we are fully conscious that there are many challenges, barriers and gloom of inaction adding to mobility crisis in our cities, we are also convinced that we can move forward if we incentivise change – however small and new it may be. This book helps us to understand the direction of change, what works and what does not. Future action based on this lesson can make mobility work for the poor and the rich.
Author Anumita Roychowdhury
Publication Centre for Science and Environment
Year 2013
ISBN 978-81-86906-72-9
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